Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Bunions, a foot deformity that impacts mobility and causes discomfort, afflicts millions of people across the globe. These bony protrusions form at the base of the big toe, gradually pushing it outward while forcing the tip to move toward the other toes. Despite common misconceptions, bunions are not solely caused by wearing ill-fitting shoes. Rather, they often stem from inherited structural issues, such as foot mechanics or arthritis. Bunions tend to worsen over time, leading to swelling, redness, and pain, especially when wearing tight or narrow footwear. Bunions can hinder daily activities and contribute to other foot ailments, like corns and calluses. While conservative measures, such as wearing wider shoes, using toe spacers, and applying ice packs can provide temporary relief, surgical intervention may be necessary for severe cases to realign the toe joint and alleviate discomfort. If you have developed a bony protrusion at the base of your big toe, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can confirm a bunion diagnosis, and offer relief and treatment options.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact one of our doctors of New Jersey and New York. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Little Silver, NJ and New York, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Hammertoe, a deformity characterized by curled or flexed toes, may necessitate surgical intervention when conservative treatments fail to provide relief. Surgical hammertoe options include bone resection to remove portions of toe bones, tendon procedures involving manipulation or transplantation to correct the imbalance, and joint fusion to stabilize the toe. Following surgery, pins or wires may be used temporarily to maintain alignment during healing, with patients transitioning to supportive footwear to aid recovery. Surgical considerations are driven by functional impairment and pain, with persistent symptoms such as pain, irritation, and skin complications warranting consideration for intervention. However, surgery may not be recommended if conservative measures suffice or if the risks outweigh the benefits. It is important to explore all treatment plans before deciding on whether to have surgery. For this reason, if you have a hammertoe that is impeding your daily activities, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our doctors from New Jersey and New York. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact our offices located in Little Silver, NJ and New York, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Morton's neuroma, a nerve disorder affecting the feet, is a condition that demands attention and understanding. This ailment is characterized by the thickening of tissues around the nerves that lead to the toes, and it often occurs between the third and fourth toes. Contrary to common belief, it is not a true neuroma, but rather a perineural fibrosis. The primary cause is the compression and irritation of the nerve, resulting in pain, tingling, and a sensation of a lump or pebble in the shoe. High-heeled shoes and tight footwear are frequently implicated in triggering or exacerbating Morton's neuroma. Understanding the symptoms, such as sharp, burning pain in the ball of the foot, is vital for early identification. Proper footwear, foot pads, and orthotics can offer relief, while severe cases may require medical intervention. By grasping the essential facts surrounding Morton's neuroma, individuals can take informed steps towards managing this foot condition. If you have pain between your toes or on the ball of your foot, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist for a diagnosis and correct treatment methods.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our doctors of New Jersey and New York. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Little Silver, NJ and New York, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 30 January 2024 00:00

The Achilles tendon, a robust fibrous band connecting the calf muscles to the heel bone, plays a pivotal role in facilitating movements like walking and running. Achilles tendon injuries encompass a spectrum of conditions, primarily characterized by inflammation, strain, or, in severe cases, tears within this vital tendon. Such injuries often result from overuse or excessive strain during physical activities, especially those involving sudden acceleration or deceleration. Poorly fitting footwear, inadequate warm-up routines, and abrupt changes in physical activity intensity may contribute to the risk of injury. Additionally, individuals with tight calf muscles or pre-existing foot conditions may find themselves more susceptible to Achilles tendon issues. Recognizing the signs, which may include pain, swelling, and restricted movement, is essential for prompt intervention. If you have endured an Achilles tendon injury, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and treat this condition.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our doctors of New Jersey and New York. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Little Silver, NJ and New York, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries

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